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Issue 118, November 1999

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Item #WD118
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A preview of
articles from the
November 1999
issue of
WOOD® magazine

WOODWORKING FEATURES
IN THIS ISSUE
 
Click Here for Larger View Shop-made hardware
Learn to fabricate handsome metal pulls, hinges, and knobs from commonly available materials.
 
North-country Windsors
Visit the shop of Minnesota craftsman Bob Dillon, and see his line of traditional Windsor chairs.
 
Click Here for Larger View Portable mitersaw stands
Find out what's available in this tool-accessory area, and which models make sense for you.
 

PRODUCT PREVIEW

 
Product Preview 1
Tool up for 2000 with our handpicked selection of the year's best new tools and gadgets.
 

WOODWORKING PROJECTS

 
Click Here for Larger View Lamp of a lifetime
Brighten a dull corner of your home with this stylish table lamp and veneer-on-plastic shade.
 
Click Here for Larger View Tablesaw accessories cabinet
Provide a home for tablesaw jigs, blades, and related items in this handy mobile unit.
 
Click Here for Larger View Yuletide sleigh coffee table
Capture a bit of nostalgia with this novel design.
 
Click Here for Larger View Birdy Bistro
Build a bird feeder from two simple turnings.
 
Click Here for Larger View Big rig for little drivers
Looking for a parking place for those tiny toy cars? Here's an attractive solution.
 
Click Here for Larger View Not such a nutty idea
This two-in-one project conveniently combines a nutcracker with a box that serves as a bowl.
 

SHORT-SUBJECT FEATURES
 
How To Thread Metal
Tap into this handy technique. Screwing a threaded fastener into a tapped hole in metal is often easier and neater than using a nut. And bolting an oft-used jig or fixture to a tapped hole in a metal tool table is usually quicker and more secure than rigging up clamps. Here's how to thread holes in metal parts easily.
 
Router Bit Review: Chamfer Bits
A great way to make on-the-money miters. We all know that chamfer bits work great for easing exposed edges. But did you know that with them you can cut dead-on miters with little setup involved? Here's how.
 
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